C.S. Lewis to be commemorated in Westminster Abbey

From CBS News, November 24, 2012:

C.S. Lewis, writer of the popular children’s novel series The Chronicles of Narnia, is to be commemorated with a stone in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey in London.

Lewis joins such greats as John Keats, William Blake, Charles Dickens and T.S. Eliot in a tradition going back 600 years.

Former poet laureate Ted Hughes was the most recent writer to be commemorated at the Abbey with a posthumous memorial stone.

Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was published in 1950 and has been enormously influential on a generation of writers as well as beloved by young readers.

Vernon White, Canon Theologian at Westminster Abbey, called Lewis “an extraordinarily imaginative and rigorous thinker and writer who was able to convey the Christian faith in a way that made it both credible and attractive to a wide range of people.

“He has had an enduring and growing influence in our national life,” White added.

He was also a scholar and adult novelist of books such as The Screwtape Letters and The Space Trilogy.

A stone will be added in Westminster Abbey during a service Nov. 22, 2013 to mark the 50th anniversary of Lewis’ death.

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About Jessica Renshaw

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2 Responses to C.S. Lewis to be commemorated in Westminster Abbey

  1. Not to mention the thinking skills of a philosopher as well.

  2. Jessica says:

    True! I doubt that it’s Lewis as “popular children’s author” that won him immortalization in the Abbey. In fact, if anything, that would have excluded him from consideration. Fellow scholars at Oxford despised his making truth accessible to the masses in analogy, metaphor, and whimsy. They blocked his career for “popularizing” philosophy and theology, leaving it to Cambridge to create for him a well-deserved academic chair. But I guess there are just too darn many readers out there who owe Lewis a debt of gratitude and want him recognized for reaching their minds and hearts through Marsh-wiggles as well as reason.

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