C. S. Lewis’ “The Great Divorce” on stage

Having enjoyed “The Screwtape Letters” on stage three times, Jerry and I are happily heading out soon for the 4:00 showing of “The Great Divorce” in Glendale; there’s another showing tonight at 8:00.  From July 17-20 the play will be in Irvine, California.  For tickets call 1-949-854-4646, Ext.1.  Check http://greatdivorceonstage.com for stage productions in other states.

“WORLD CLASS THEATRE.”  World Magazine

FASCINATING.” The Arizona Republic

“A JOY TO WATCH” Charleston City Paper

Audiences agree with the critics that Fellowship for Performing Arts’ stage adaptation of C.S. Lewis’ THE GREAT DIVORCE entertains, engages and starts conversations that continue long after the curtain comes down.

Simply breathtaking. Creative and thought provoking.” Judy, Phoenix

The set and the effects were exceptional.” Gary, Kansas City

We are still talking about it. Mary, Birmingham

In C.S. Lewis’ THE GREAT DIVORCE veteran Broadway actors bring some of Lewis’ quirkiest, hopelessly flawed but still worth redeeming characters to life on stage in 90 humorous, witty and enchanting minutes.

Showcased in an imaginative stage design that transforms the world of the play from bleak and dark to lush and beautiful, THE GREAT DIVORCE takes audiences on a fabulous bus ride from a suburb in Hell to a celestial new world on the outskirts of Heaven.

Fellowship for Performing Arts is best known for its nationwide theatrical hit sensation, THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS. And THE GREAT DIVORCE—featuring the keen observation of human frailties and profound supernatural insights that are C. S. Lewis’ trademarks— makes the perfect choice for FPA’s newest production.

“Our challenge was to turn a complex theological fantasy into an accessible stage adaptation that entertains and provokes lively discussion,” says FPA Founder and Artistic Director Max McLean.

World Magazine found it up to the task: “Max McLean’s stage production of THE GREAT DIVORCE rises to the challenge, raising questions of eternal significance with disarming ease.”

”The actors are working magic…a joy to watch,” declares the Charleston City Paper. ‘As far as a standard theater-going experience goes it was surreal. As I left the theater, I heard theatre-goers talk about heaven and hell and the play’s merits and faults. If art is supposed to be beautiful, this production of THE GREAT DIVORCE is certainly art. And if art is meant to stimulate discussion, to make you think, to make you wonder and talk to your neighbor about your doubts and fears, then THE GREAT DIVORCE is certainly art.”

The Arizona Republic agrees, “Lewis lively wit and generous sense of humor shine through… THE GREAT DIVORCE succeeds bringing Lewis’ voice to life onstage with engaging performances and a dash of visual panache.

C.S. Lewis’ THE GREAT DIVORCE stars Tom Beckett (Bobby Boland, Epic Proportions and The Father on Broadway and “Elbridge Gerry” in HBO’s John Adams), Joel Rainwater (The Lion King, National Tour) and Christa Scott-Reed (The Pitmen Painters on Broadway).

Fellowship for Performing Arts is based in New York City with Max McLean as Founder and Artistic Director. Adapted by McLean and Brian Watkins, THE GREAT DIVORCE is directed by Bill Castellino, with the creative team including Executive Producer and General Manager Ken Denison of Aruba Productions, Scenic Designer Kelly James Tighe, Costume Designer Nicole Wee and Lighting Designer Michael Gilliam. Original Music and Sound Design are by John Gromada with Projections by Chris Kateff.

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About Jessica Renshaw

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This entry was posted in art, C.S. Lewis, Heaven, Literature, My husband Jerry and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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